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  • Common Heir is Cultivating Change Through Plastic-Free Skincare

    the unwash review

    Traditional makeup serums are typically packaged using pumps or droppers, different ideations such as capsules aren’t a new concept but typically aren’t honed in on as being a sustainable product. Common Heir created a system of biodegradable plastic-free serum pods for retinol, vitamin C, and ceramide serum. The brand is innovating the way we think about sustainability in the beauty industry and beyond. Their products are meant to spark joy and make people feel good about themselves and their self-care routine. Common Heir’s mission empowers the consumer to make positive changes and push the sustainability conversation forward.

    Common Heir saw an opportunity to create a gateway into using more sustainable products, without only catering to an audience that solely sought after zero-waste products. The company shows that there’s more to a sustainable lifestyle than just the term ‘zero-waste’. Their product line is both vegan and cruelty-free. Their current product line can build the perfect, streamlined skincare routine to tackle all your skincare needs including brightness, resurfacing, and hydration. Their high-quality formulations take into account both sensitive and melanated skin to help deliver results across the board for everyone regardless of skin type.

    “We wanted to make sustainability sexy. That’s the only way I think you’re going to change hearts and minds to make the kind of impact that we want to make.” – Cary Lin, Common Heir Co-Founder

    The brand was founded in 2019 by two women, Cary Lin and Angela Ubias that were seeking sustainable products with a luxury experience. Inspired by a common feeling by many founders in the sustainability space, Cary Lin was overwhelmed by the amount of plastic waste on our beaches and wanted to work towards a solution. The vitamin C, retinol and ceramide formulas are highly concentrated, single doses that are packaged in plastic-free, biodegradable capsules. For outer packaging recyclable paper packaging is lightweight, therefore, reducing carbon emissions.

    Common Heir is signaling a sustainable future by highlighting that products that don’t create waste are just not effective if not more than their traditional counterparts, and that there still can be a luxury experience that the brand embodies. The founder’s goal was to change the expectations of what a sustainable brand looks like which they achieved with their award-winning packaging and standout product formulations. The brand is creating an inclusive skincare brand that doesn’t compromise quality while also doing good for the planet.

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    Rif Care

    New naturally-sourced and sustainable period care options continue to fill our Instagram pages and shopping carts, pushing traditionally wasteful products to the back of shelves. What sets Rif care apart from other alternatives is their use of upcycled hemp fiber, a carbon sequestering super plant with naturally antibacterial and buttery soft properties.

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    NOTO Botanicals

    Noto Botanics is an inclusive skincare and beauty brand that is focused on making an impact, especially in the LGBTQIA+ community. The brand is multi-use for an array of skincare needs with its minimalist, streamlined product line. Noto Botanics is just as much about its products as they are about its mission. The brand’s DNA is rooted in inclusivity, community, and giving back.

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    Melyon

    Melyon is a Swedish skincare brand based out of Stockholm that is focused on inclusivity, sustainability, and ethical sourcing. The brand’s products transcend any ideas about beauty standards and rather embody an aura of accessibility and inclusivity around beauty. Melyon wanted to create products that not only were going to deliver results and have high-quality vegan formulations but were also made with environmental conservation in mind.

    The Skincare Brand That Gives Back, Noto Botanics

    the unwash review

    Noto Botanics is an inclusive skincare and beauty brand that is focused on making an impact, especially in the LGBTQIA+ community. The brand is multi-use for an array of skincare needs with its minimalist, streamlined product line. Their line includes moisturizers, serums, cleansers, and lip and cheek tints. Noto Botanics is just as much about its products as they are about its mission. The brand’s DNA is rooted in inclusivity, community, and giving back.

    Gloria Noto worked as a celebrity makeup artist with the hopes of eventually starting her own line. Her goal was to create a company that cultivated connections and celebrated everyone. Noto Botanics is more than a skincare and beauty brand but a company that stands for being unapologetically yourself. Gloria wanted to create space for fellow queer folks to feel heard and seen in the beauty industry. There was a lack of inclusivity and representation that Noto is working to fill. Noto gives back by regularly raising money for organizations such as Planned Parenthood, Project Q, and the ACLU, when you purchase a Noto product your money is actively giving back.

    “It is a political brand. I personally believe that every time you spend your dollar, you’re voting towards something or you’re supporting something, whether you realize it or not.” – Gloria Noto, NOTO Botanics Founder

    The brand uses primarily recyclable glass packaging with limited plastic usage which is 35% PCR. To continue their sustainability commitment, their flagship store in Los Angeles has a refill station for their products with hopes of expanding to locations. Their line is vegan, cruelty-free, and uses fair trade, ethically sourced pigments. They take a less is more approach with the belief that sustainability is also about finding products that fulfill multiple needs at once. Noto Botanics is genderless and made for all skin types. From the formulation to the packaging the brand steers in a neutral direction to appeal to everyone and all identities. 

    Noto is working to bring more inclusivity to the beauty industry with their mission of inclusivity. It’s important to find brands that you truly align with and feel empowered by. For Noto, their mission is more than a marketing opportunity or a pride month campaign but is a year-round, 24/7 commitment to creating equitable change and amplifying queer identities. The brand aligns itself with the ‘vote with your dollar’ mantra and believes that you’re supporting what you’re putting your money towards. Noto makes an impact in more than one way, their products go the extra mile and it’s a brand that walks the walk.

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    Klur

    Klur, a skincare brand focused on optimal skin health is rooted in values of inclusivity and ethical product sourcing. The Los Angeles-based brand takes a scientific approach to formulating products that deliver long-lasting results while being inspired by nature. Klur’s motto is being an ‘eco-inclusive’ brand that they live up to through their low-impact practices.

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    Corpus

     Corpus appeals to consumers looking for high-quality, naturally formulated products while being climate conscious through responsible packaging and ethical manufacturing practices. The product line stands out from the crowd with its signature light green hue and sleek design. The aesthetically pleasing design will transport your bathroom or vanity to the likeness of a luxury boutique hotel.

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    The Wilds

    Designed to simplify your skincare routine with quality products that deliver results, Canadian skincare brand, The Wilds embodies a less is more approach. The Wilds is a genderless skincare line that takes inspiration from nature and is suitable for various skin types.

    Underprotection is Making Sustainability Sexy

    the unwash review

    Underprotection makes sustainability sexy with its environmentally conscious lingerie line. Based out of Copenhagen, the founders saw the need for a sustainable option for something we need every day – underwear. The brand came into the industry with hopes of sparking change as they were one of few sustainable options on the market. As the brand has grown they have stayed true to their commitment to being a sustainable, ethical, and high-quality choice for intimates. Underprotection is transparent about everything from material sourcing, and factory conditions to shipping materials – putting a large value on consumer trust. Underprotection has made sustainability look better than ever before.

    Founded in 2010, the brand has since moved into other clothing categories such as swim, lounge, basics, and maternity. When the brand launched over ten years ago, founder Stephan Rosenkilde felt that there were no sustainable options within the clothing industry, especially not for intimates. The brand focuses on ethical sourcing and production processes as well as ensuring fair wages and safe working conditions. The main fabrics Underprotection uses are recycled wool, organic cotton, and recycled PET bottles for their swimwear collection.

    “The fashion industry is one of the biggest polluters in the world, which is why it is so important to create sustainable fashion. Back in 2010, there was not really any sustainable – and at the same time fashionable – lingerie, which is why we founded Underprotection. We do what we can to change the industry.” – Stephan Rosenkilde, Underprotection CEO.

    The brand is a certified B Corporation and has launched take-back, repair, and upcycle programs to minimize waste production and extend the longevity of its items. Transparency is a clear focus for the brand as they share their sustainability goals, clarity on materials being used, and detailed information about their production process. Choosing high-quality materials is at the forefront of Underprotection as their clothes sit close to the skin, especially their undergarments. Not only does the brand want their clothing to be good for the environment but also a better choice than conventional competitors for their consumers.

    The brand’s expansion outside of lingerie allows for further sustainable clothing options for everyday wear. Currently, Underprotection only offers XS-XL and we hope they expand their size range in the future for greater inclusivity as everyone should be allotted to shop ethically regardless of size. Whether you’re looking for some new loungewear to hang out in or everyday intimates, Underprotection is a brand that is committed to being a sustainable switch that reflects consumers’ values. They realize sustainability isn’t just about materials and limiting waste but about the greater community impact which reflects our ‘People Before Products’ motto. Underprotection wants their customers to not only feel beautiful in their lingerie but know they made a purchase that they can feel good about.

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    Klur

    Klur, a skincare brand focused on optimal skin health is rooted in values of inclusivity and ethical product sourcing. The Los Angeles-based brand takes a scientific approach to formulating products that deliver long-lasting results while being inspired by nature. Klur’s motto is being an ‘eco-inclusive’ brand that they live up to through their low-impact practices. The brand’s skincare products give streamlined solutions for various skin needs that are inclusive for all.

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    Eauso Vert

    Sourced with sustainable materials and committed to ingredient transparency, Eauso Vert is hoping to create a new standard in the luxury fragrance industry. Launched with six scents that range from fresh to woody and warm, there is a scent perfect for anyone. The founders reminisce on their memories with fragrance, whether childhood stories or travel, and wanted to create a fragrance line that helps the consumer tell a story.

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    Completedworks

    Completedworks uses reclaimed, recycled, and ethically sourced materials such as marble, glass, bio-resin, and silver. The brand proves you don’t have to compromise design and style for sustainable practices but rather that the two can work in harmony to create timeless, wearable pieces. Sustainability is at the core of the brand’s ethos and the brand is committed to ensuring there is little to no negative environmental impact resulting from its products or shipping process.

    Eco-Inclusive Skincare Brand, Klur

    the unwash review

    Klur, a skincare brand focused on optimal skin health is rooted in values of inclusivity and ethical product sourcing. The Los Angeles-based brand takes a scientific approach to formulating products that deliver long-lasting results while being inspired by nature. Klur’s motto is being an ‘eco-inclusive’ brand that they live up to through their low-impact practices. The brand’s skincare products give streamlined solutions for various skin needs that are inclusive for all. Their Brilliant Light vitamin C serum, Sculpture + A, and Gentle Matter Cleanser are some of their fan-favorite products meant to correct, hydrate and restore skin to its healthiest state.

    Founder of Klur, Lesley Thorton spent a decade creating products and helping others achieve their personal skincare goals while working for Estee Lauder which led to the creation of Klur as we know it today. When it comes to finding products that have a focus on environmentally friendly ingredients, Lesley realized there wasn’t representation for people of color within this space and wanted to create a brand that she could see herself in. Klur launched in 2019 with products made to support the needs and wear of everyday life – for everyone.  

    “Centering inclusivity and community as the fundamental values required to preserve planetary ecology and achieve true collective sustainability.” – Lesley Thorton, Klur Founder

    The brand is deeply committed to cultivating connections within its community. Klur was designed to create a space for all people from all ethnicities and backgrounds to feel supported and seen through the brand’s ethos. Their emphasis on community building also includes education on sustainability efforts such as proper recycling practices. The brand primarily uses pharmaceutical-grade glass packaging, aluminum components, and BPA-free plastic only when deemed necessary. Klur’s formulations are both vegan and cruelty-free, using only biodegradable ingredients. They look at sustainability through a holistic lens acknowledging that it’s more than just finding the most sustainable packaging but also finding brands that support our everyday needs. 

    Klur walks the walk and is a values-driven brand. The small but mighty independently owned and operated company sets the bar high within the wellness and skincare industry. Their core values are reflected in their products, from formulation, packaging choices, and commitment to consumer education. Klur is a refreshing addition to the beauty industry and a much-needed breath of fresh air for people in search of companies that they can feel genuinely good about supporting. 

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    Corpus

     Corpus appeals to consumers looking for high-quality, naturally formulated products while being climate conscious through responsible packaging and ethical manufacturing practices. Corpus launched with their fan-favorite deodorant stick and has now expanded into deodorant spray, body wash, and candles. Their products come in an assortment of different scents and are formulated similarly to perfumes with long-lasting fragrance payoff. 

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    Natureofthings

    Natureofthings is a holistic body care brand inspired by and rooted in nature, including its commitment to sustainability. The brand is committed to creating products meant to make life more pleasurable and enjoyable. Their minimal branding makes for easy packaging repurposing as the founders ensured to think about their products’ entire lifecycle at the inception of the brand.

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    Melyon

    Melyon is a Swedish skincare brand based out of Stockholm that is focused on inclusivity, sustainability, and ethical sourcing. Founded by Roger Dupé, an immigrant from Western Africa, Roger was inspired by his roots to create a skincare line that had people of color in mind and wanted them to feel as if this was a skincare line specifically for them and the needs of darker skin. The brand’s products transcend any ideas about beauty standards and rather embody an aura of accessibility and inclusivity around beauty.

    Can Brands Meet Consumers Need for Authenticity?

    the unwash: social impact

    Consumers are hungrier than ever to cultivate connections with their favorite brands but are brands able to deliver the level of authentic connection people are craving? More than ever the power has been put into the consumers’ hands. Brands that are founder-led have skyrocketed into popularity and have had an innate ability to not only create a connection with their audience but also establish trust. Ultimately, consumers are just wanting brands to keep it real and when they don’t – the windfall is steep. Overall, there’s a large yearning for depth, not just a recognizable logo. Consumers are turning to brands that are creating a community culture, not just selling great products.

    Over the past few years, authenticity has risen to the forefront of consumers’ minds – a drastic shift from a world where big marketing schemes, billboards, and tantalizing commercials ruled the industry. In the age of social media people don’t need large-scale advertisements that were once needed to be able to sell a product. The ability to share individual experiences with a product is at our fingertips, whether that be for better or worse. Perfection is no longer the goal. Brands are leaning into the curiosity to pull back the curtain and show what happens behind the scenes, something that larger brands are typically unable to do successfully in a way that feels authentic for viewers. The ability to create a level of realness around a brand is a daunting task, especially in a hyper-critical age but, people more and more are being drawn to something that feels relatable.

    “There is a much bigger opportunity to have founder-led brands rather than corporate-led ones so that we’re getting brands with values. There is a clear interest from consumers on that. We can democratize beauty in a way.” – Megan Graham, Ries Founder

    The availability of knowledge in the media age also creates a demand for transparency. Can brands keep up with the need to be able to walk the walk? There’s no more room for too-good-to-be-true claims or greenwashing marketing gimmicks. Consumers are wanting to know that what they’re buying is worth it as awareness of the greater impact of our purchases is becoming more apparent. Smaller, founder-led brands have seen increased success with taking a ‘hide-nothing’ approach by being honest, even about their flaws. Skincare brand, Dieux is the ultimate example of this and is something the brand credits its success for. There are always ways to be doing something better. There’s always a more sustainable option or a more ethical way to produce a product but these might not be readily available or feasible for a newer brand but honesty keeps the sales growing.

    Community is driving sales and consumers want to be connected. Currently, consumers are more inclined to buy products and invest in brands that align with their values. The digital age has opened up the floodgates for consumers to connect with like-minded individuals and bond over their favorite products or brands in a way that hasn’t happened before. The need for authenticity creates a unique bottom line for brands. Emerging and household brand names alike have to fulfill these needs and be able to meet the new standards that have been set. Giving an occasional behind the scene look, vague sustainability metrics, and a one-off inclusion marketing bit is no longer acceptable. 

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    DedCool

    DedCool places a lot of its focus when creating new products on usability in the day-to-day. Instead of solely purchasing a perfume that you spray on yourself, your clothes, or around your apartment, their product range allows the consumer to have versatility with their signature scent through their detergent, home fragrance, and car fragrance products. The brand’s fragrances are genderless and come in various scent families.

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    Klur

    Klur, a skincare brand focused on optimal skin health is rooted in values of inclusivity and ethical product sourcing. The Los Angeles-based brand takes a scientific approach to formulating products that deliver long-lasting results while being inspired by nature. Klur’s motto is being an ‘eco-inclusive’ brand that they live up to through their low-impact practices. The brand’s skincare products give streamlined solutions for various skin needs that are inclusive for all.

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    Dieux

    The brand credits its vastly growing audience to Dieux’s authenticity. The founders keep it real with their consumers and have no interest in marketing gimmicks but are determined to sell high-quality products that pack a punch. Their concise yet impactful product line focuses on protecting the skin barrier and locking moisture in. Dieux is helping consumers buy less because their products are ‘dieux-ing’ more.

    The Kjaer Weis Impact on Refillable Beauty

    the unwash review

    Luxury makeup line, Kjaer Weis has been a long-time industry leader when it comes to refillable and recyclable packaging. Kjaer Weis isn’t alone in this as other brands in the luxury sector such as Henry Rose and Completedworks have also put sustainability at the forefront of their brand ethos. Beauty products create an extra level of difficulty as it can be hard to ditch plastic components or find packaging options that won’t disrupt formulations. The brand debuted in 2010 with a focus on environmental consciousness including all of its products being certified organic, hence their commitment to the ‘Sustainable Since Day One’ slogan. They launched with refillable compacts that have evolved into the beloved packaging we see over ten years later.

    Kjaer Weis was founded by Danish makeup artist, Kristen Weis. Kristen founded the brand with the mentality that makeup should both deliver a quality result as well as being sustainable. The Danish makeup artist has over twenty years of industry experience and saw the negative impact beauty products were having on models’ skin and the environment. Kjaer Weis products are meant to enhance the wearer’s natural beauty with many of their products being light to medium coverage with a glowy finish. The brand makes buying sustainable beauty products a breeze but its limited shade range provides less accessibility for darker skin tones. There is a general lack of consistency with deep shade options across their product lines but we hope they continue to grow these options so their products can be enjoyed across the spectrum for all skin shades.


    “It was impossible to ignore and not feel moved to create something different.” – Kristen Weis, Kjaer Weis Founder

    In 2020 the brand launched its ‘Red Edition’ marking its tenth anniversary which is comprised of recyclable and compostable materials. Kjaer Weis has a mix of packaging options alongside their Red Edition. Their classic Iconic Edition includes their metal refillable compacts, the refills are packaged in recyclable paper. Other products such as skincare and mascara come in a mix of glass and aluminum packaging.

    Kjaer Weis intertwines sustainability and luxury beauty in a way that creates meaningful industry change. The brand has been an innovator for modern makeup before it was deemed an industry necessity to create actionable change in terms of product waste. Their products are a photo shoot and runway staple for a reason, giving a ‘your skin but better’ glow with all of their products. Kjaer Weis has been at the forefront of sustainable beauty since their founding and continues to make innovations that the

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    Henry Rose

    Henry Rose has been around since 2019 but only recently became our fragrance staple. In 2019 the brand launched with five fragrances and has more than doubled its range, adding home fragrance and body care to its offerings. Henry Rose has three main mission pillars: ingredients, environmental, and social responsibility. The brand’s fragrances are nearly 99% biodegradable, and all the bottles are made from 90% recycled glass.

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    Dieux

    The brand credits its vastly growing audience to Dieux’s authenticity. The founders keep it real with their consumers and have no interest in marketing gimmicks but are determined to sell high-quality products that pack a punch. Their concise yet impactful product line focuses on protecting the skin barrier and locking moisture in. The brand’s founders aimed to create products that truly do what they claim because they’re putting science at the forefront.

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    Eauso Vert

    Eauso Vert is hoping to create a new standard in the luxury fragrance industry. Launched with six scents that range from fresh to woody and warm, there is a scent perfect for anyone. The founders reminisce on their memories with fragrance, whether childhood stories or travel, and wanted to create a fragrance line that helps the consumer tell a story. 

    Megan Graham Wants Your Beauty Routine to Travel with You

    the unwash: exclusive interview

    After earning a degree in textile science and finding herself in a job that required constant travel, Megan Graham wanted to find a solution for travel-sized products that weren’t fitting her needs and ultimately ended up in the trash. The thought of frequent waste that was being created from these products became a point of frustration that she wanted to find a solution for. This was eventually tabled for a successful marketing career at Vogue and Condé Nast until the itch returned and Megan knew she could create a product for consumers like herself and fill a much-needed gap in the market. Whether it be buying travel-sized products that aren’t your personal favorites or trying to use drug store refillable bottles that leak or break both of these created more stress and unsatisfactory experiences for an on-the-go routine. Megan left her corporate job at Condé Nast to launch Ries – a solutions-oriented company founded to make our travel routines simpler and more streamlined. Ries is a more practical travel option that doubles as a sustainable solution for plastic waste. Their TSA-approved travel bottles are the perfect travel buddy. Created from post-consumer recycled materials that are dishwasher safe, they are made to last and create less waste in the process. We sat down with Megan to discuss sustainability, the process of launching a startup, and the future of Ries. 

    What was the process of deciding to go from a corporate job to being the founder of a company? 

    I worked in fashion forecasting, marketing, and advertising for most of my career and I really loved it but my first role in trend forecasting was full-time remote, before it was the norm. I loved the autonomy of that role. It put me in better touch with my intuition, decision-making, and being able to think on my feet. I realized because of that freedom the perfect role for me was to build something how I wanted to. I appreciate being out in the world like I was in my first role. When it came to making this shift to running a business – I had this idea that I had a strong feeling about what I wanted to go after. Shifting from office life to running a business was an easy shift for me. Switching back to this autonomous life is such a confidence boost.

    “People have very specific needs in their routine and the way people are using the Ries bottles brings me so much joy.” – Megan Graham, Founder of Ries

    While you were the Director of Beauty Marketing at Vogue did you start to see an influx of interest in sustainable brands?

    Sustainability was more about ingredients at that point in 2017-2019. Sustainability in packaging wasn’t really a thing, even with refillables there wasn’t much there. It was mainly about the ingredients. One that caught my attention was Seed which started to lean into more innovative, sustainable packaging.

    Where do you see the beauty industry going in the future in terms of sustainability?

    There are so many more brands now that are taking an interest in sustainability. There is a much bigger opportunity to have founder-led brands rather than corporate-led ones so that we’re getting brands with values. There is a clear interest from consumers on that. We can democratize beauty in a way. So many people are doing incredible, innovative things so I see a much more sustainable future for beauty in the next five to ten years. In the next ten years, I think it will look very different and there will be a huge impact on the reduction of waste. The more the consumers demand it, the more companies have to do something about it. Keep demanding, keep asking, it’s so important. Supporting small businesses and founder-led brands is also incredibly important. It gives me hope that we’re in a moment of innovation and that it’ll continue. Even in the last five years, I’ve seen so much change, like I said it used to be more ingredient-focused but now customers are really paying attention on a larger scale and change is happening.

    Now that you’re in Sephora, what is next for Ries?

    We have more products coming out, we get lots of questions about new colors so we are launching new colors this year. We have more products coming out that tie into circularity with a focus on recycled materials. Overall these will be focused on the process of making the transition to a more sustainable on-the-go routine. Think – simplifying your routine, making it more sustainable and more mobile. I built this brand for myself so I’m thinking about what you need when going to the gym, on a flight. What are these things I want to improve upon and make the experience better? More non-container things are coming but can’t say too much yet. We’re moving into new spaces as well. I can’t say too much yet but there are lots more to come that you’ll be hearing about closer to the summer.

    Ries landed in Sephora within its first year of being on the market and is the first refillable travel bottle to be on the retailer’s shelves. Throughout our conversation with Megan, thoughts around ‘doing the best with what is available to us now’ was frequently brought up and how as brands and consumers this is something to lean into. Brands like Ries are making sustainable solutions while also emphasizing creating a positive customer experience for on-the-go product usage – which we shouldn’t have to sacrifice even when traveling. Megan hinted that there could be further retailer expansion in the future but for any Ries news, we’ll be anxiously awaiting and ready to give everyone the full scoop.

    Use code UNWASH15 for 15% off your purchase at ries-ries.com

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    Ries

    Ries is a line of TSA-size approved refillable containers retailing at $18. The bottles are crafted from post-consumer recycled plastic and created with the purpose of consistent reuse. Ries puts value on the circularity of their product and hopes choices like using up-cycled materials will become more of a norm in the beauty industry. 

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    Natureofthings

    Natureofthings is a holistic body care brand inspired by and rooted in nature, including its commitment to sustainability. The brand is committed to creating products meant to make life more pleasurable and enjoyable. Natureofthings puts a large emphasis on ingredient education and transparency, building trust with their consumers so that they are fully aware of what is in their products. 

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    Completedworks

    Completedworks creates designs that are meant to resemble pieces of art and stand the test of time, without succumbing to trend cycles. The brand uses reclaimed, recycled, and ethically sourced materials such as marble, glass, bio-resin, and silver. Completedworks proves you don’t have to compromise design and style for sustainable practices but rather that the two can work in harmony to create timeless, wearable pieces.

    Natureofthings Looks at Wellness Through a Holistic Lens

    the unwash review

    Natureofthings is a holistic body care brand inspired by and rooted in nature, including its commitment to sustainability. The brand is committed to creating products meant to make life more pleasurable and enjoyable. Their minimal branding makes for easy packaging repurposing as the founders ensured to think about their products’ entire lifecycle at the inception of the brand. Natureofthings puts a large emphasis on ingredient education and transparency, building trust with their consumers so that they are fully aware of what is in their products. 

    The brand was launched in 2019 by JP Collett and Jamie Leilani Pelayo. Natureofthings hit the market with body care staples and in 2021 expanded into beauty and more recently, hair care. Their formulations are created with naturally derived ingredients that can relieve the inflammation and stress that the skin faces. Many of their formulations are concentrates and powder formulas to reduce the excess water that most personal care products contain. All of their products adhere to strict EU regulations for cosmetic and personal care products. Their formulations and ingredients are inspired by Eastern medicinal practices and herbalism such as clay, volcanic ash, and sea salt. Most of their products are plant or botanical based and are Leaping Bunny Certified, therefore are cruelty-free and vegan.

    We believe there is a much greater opportunity than we originally imagined to be of service to the client in helping them find some balance by incorporating purposeful daily self-care as they greet or end each new day in these times of uncertainty. – Jamie Lelani Pelayo, Natureofthings Co-Founder

    Natureofthings is committed to using as little plastic as possible and mainly uses recyclable materials for their packaging components such as glass and aluminum. The brand also uses unconventional and compostable materials including wood vessels and Biotré compostable pouches. In 2021 they were awarded the Beacon Award from Beauty Independent for their innovative and sustainable packaging. The founders knew that recyclability was not a reliable option for packaging as many materials do not end up being fully recyclable and relied more on packaging components that can be easily repurposed.

    The wellness brand is focused on delivering uncompromising quality products with a focus on environmental consciousness. They continue to grow into different product categories including new travel size options making bringing sustainable products on the go an easy experience. Their products are made to enhance wellness experiences such as their magnesium soaks and floral restorative bath. Natureofthings largely revolves around customer experience from the educational e-commerce platform, sustainability efforts, and thoughtful product line.

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    Corpus

    Corpus appeals to consumers looking for high-quality, naturally formulated products while being climate conscious through responsible packaging and ethical manufacturing practices. Corpus launched with their fan-favorite deodorant stick and has now expanded into deodorant spray, body wash, and candles. The product line stands out from the crowd with its signature light green hue and sleek design.

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    Fluff Cosmetics

    This Australian-based brand is dedicated to making the beauty industry feel more empowering, especially for young people. The brand was founded on the principle that you shouldn’t feel less than when you aren’t wearing makeup. Fluff is about using products that make you feel beautiful whether or not you wear them. Makeup can be a great form of art and self-expression, but Fluff wanted to create a line that can be used for when you want a product that gives a natural finish to embrace your everyday beauty.

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    Kjaer Weis

    Luxury makeup line, Kjaer Weis has been a long-time industry leader when it comes to refillable and recyclable packaging. Kjaer Weis intertwines sustainability and luxury beauty in a way that creates meaningful industry change. The brand has been an innovator for modern makeup before it was deemed an industry necessity to create actionable change in terms of product waste.

    Your Trash is Anna Molinari’s Treasure

    the unwash: exclusive interview

    Fashion designer Anna Molinari’s TikTok went viral upon her first posting in 2020 of her upcycled designs using unconventional materials – mainly trash. The intrigue in her designs propelled Anna to become a full-fledged upcycler and to use her platform to fuel her passion for sustainable fashion. Many are familiar with Anna’s work for her viral dress that provided social and political commentary on social justice movements and the COVID-19 pandemic. The dress was made from newspaper clippings about the pandemic and the resurgence of the Black Lives Matter movement – both intersecting historical moments in United States history. The design included a mask and slit to show a band-aid for the wearer’s Coronavirus vaccine. The dress sparked a meaningful response from viewers resulting in Anna citing this moment as being one she is most proud of as a young designer. Now her platform has over 300,000 followers where she shares her brand’s designs and shares tips on how to begin upcycling. The Unwash sat down with Anna to discuss her takes on sustainable fashion, the responsibility that comes with having a large platform, and her design goals.

    What sparked your passion for sustainability within your designs? 

    I’ve been making clothes since I was eight years old and it all started from watching a marathon of Project Runway. I felt so inspired and fell in love with the concept of fashion. As I was watching the marathon I made my first shirt and from then on I’ve never questioned that it was what I’m supposed to do. My parents taught me to fund my passion so I unintentionally became very scrappy, using mostly second-hand materials from the jump. As I got older and went to college for fashion I began to learn more about the textile industry and how detrimental it is to the environment. This was further confirmation for me that I need to be using second-hand materials. Throughout my education I experimented with sculpture, using recycled materials, I loved working with weird and unconventional materials. In 2020 the second video I posted on TikTok got over a million views where I was showing these sculpture pieces using unconventional materials like a dress I made out of plastic straws. That further solidified that I wanted to keep going down this path. Sustainability has always been at my core and TikTok gives me a larger sense of responsibility to promote sustainability.

    “How can I enable people to actually make a difference in their everyday lives?” – Anna Molinari, Fashion Designer

    Do you have any process for choosing the materials you use? 

    I have people keep what they inevitably produce. In the process of keeping my trash, I’ve learned how much we create and I can’t even make enough things to keep up with what I’m using in my everyday life. It’s kind of startling. I also have brand deals where brands will send me their second-hand materials like phone parts from Samsung.

    How do you feel about the difference your platform is making?  

    I often wonder how I can enable people to actually make a difference in their everyday lives. Wearing my brand isn’t necessarily making a difference, more so it’s sending a message. I was thinking about using extra fabric and plastic scraps to stuff a pillow. I then thought why don’t I make decorative pillows where people can then fill them with their own single-use plastics? You don’t have to know anything about fashion to do this and it’s a way to get consumers to think about their single-use plastics.

    Where do you hope the fashion industry is going and where do you think it’s actually going? 

    I don’t understand why we still have factories where people are still treated unfairly. I really don’t understand why fast fashion still exists. There needs to be an actual shift away from fast fashion to slower fashion such as small businesses, second-hand, and clothing swaps. In the long run, we don’t need more clothes, we just need new ways to do clothes. Unfortunately, I think overconsumption and insane trend cycles, and Amazon fashion are going to continue to grow. I hope other young designers like myself and people that shop in the same mindset as I do can start spending their money in smarter ways. If enough people do it, maybe there can be a change.

    What is something you hope your audience takes away from your content?

    Like I said earlier, we don’t need new clothes, we need new ways to do clothes. What I try to show is that you don’t even need to know how to sew, it’s about thinking outside of the box. I want to encourage people to be creative in a sustainable way which is what I want people to take from my content. When there’s a tangible difference that people are making and there’s a physical way that I’m impacting people is the coolest thing. Once you start thinking as a sustainable creative it’s hard not to at all times, you start to see everything as a project and inspiration.

    Out of all of your designs, which is your favorite? 

    Hands down, the newspaper dress. The reaction I got from that dress gives me butterflies when I think about it. People would reach out to me telling me they lost a family member and they felt that the dress memorialized them or people of color reaching out to express that the dress made them feel heard. People were able to find something positive through this dress. We need things that both liberate us and bring us together, for me that’s through fashion.

    You’ve had lots of amazing opportunities such as NYFW, Julia Fox wearing your design, and being on Upcycle Nation. What has been the most memorable?

    Other than the reactions from the newspaper dress, the coolest moment was Upcycle Nation. One of the judges is big in the upcycling community, Cho. He was having his debut fashion week collection after the show aired and he reached out to me to assist him. I worked with him on castings and fittings, even making two of the dresses and styling. It was cool making such a genuine connection with a mentor. It was great to have him bring me up with him and it was a full-circle moment. This past fashion week was the most surreal moment I’ve had so far. 

    Out of all of the materials you’ve used, what is your favorite and what do you hope to experiment with next? 

    Plastic bags are my favorite for the graphics and how recognizable they are. I’m currently collecting bread bag tabs so that might be next but I’m wanting to get more unconventional. 

    What impact do you hope to have on the industry? 

    I want people to be more aware of what they are buying and I want people to look for alternatives before making a fast fashion or luxury purchase. I want people to think harder when they shop and for people to be more thoughtful. 

    Do you have a sustainability tip for beginners?

    I would encourage people to keep their trash for a week and sort it to then look at the recycling rules in their town. Through collecting my own trash I’ve learned a lot about what I’m doing wrong and I think it’s an important experience to learn from.

    Anna’s platform is a source of creativity for her viewers and provides tangible ways to find sustainable solutions. Her brand, Instinct Brand brings her upcycling creations to consumers and continues to grow in popularity with a new drop that is releasing soon. While referencing brands that inspire her HODA COVA was a notable mention which recently landed a collaboration with Gucci to upcycle the brand’s belts into purses. Bringing upcycling into the luxury space is a huge milestone that hopefully continues to grow. Young designers like Anna Molinari are using their platforms to create change and inspire their audience to learn more about their social impact.

    Keep up with Anna on TikTok at @annamolinstinct and Instagram @annamo.1

    01

    Completedworks

    Completedworks is a luxury jewelry line that has become a go-to for celebrities and stylists alike. The brand’s pieces have been seen on the likes of Emma Watson, Maya Rudolph, and Selena Gomez as well as being featured on an array of magazine covers and red carpets. Completedworks creates designs that are meant to resemble pieces of art and stand the test of time, without succumbing to trend cycles. All of their jewelry is made from recycled or Fair Trade materials.

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    Attire the Studio

    Rather than cashing in on lucrative brand deals to create fast fashion capsule collections, the need for positive change in the fashion industry was calling. Attire is a luxury fashion brand based out of Paris that focuses on radical transparency, excellent quality, and ethical sourcing. The brand mainly sells luxury staples that will stand the test of time, such as classic trench coats, minimalist knitwear, and everyday basics.

    03

    Suss Knits

    The mother-daughter duo behind Suss Knits (pronounced sOOs) is committed to slow and small batch fashion and keeping their manufacturing process as low waste as possible. Intending to create a knitwear line focused on sustainability, ethical production practices, and inclusivity, Suss is creating knits to be enjoyed by everyone. Inspired by their Swedish heritage, 80’s grunge, and inspiring individuality, the brand capitalizes on knit as an art form.

    Ditch the Shampoo Bottle with Flora Flora Co

    the unwash review

    Written by Contributing Editor Liz Grogan

    For plastic-free haircare that works, try Flora Flora Co’s shampoo and conditioner bars, packed with naturally derived ingredients, for a sustainable swap without sacrificing performance and aesthetics. Their salon-quality, biodegradable bars increase shine, provide a powerful lather, and contain an easy-grip shape designed for wet hands. 
    Founder Sarah Cloes created Flora Flora Co after witnessing first-hand how single-use plastics were killing sea life and crowding the beautiful beaches of Hawaii. She started avoiding products sold in plastic bottles, but desired more from the shampoo bars she tried. Since she launched Flora Flora Co in 2020, all of their hair products have been made in small batches with the highest quality, sustainably sourced ingredients. The gentle coconut-derived cleaning agents provide a gentle eco-friendly wash without stripping your strands or creating build-up. The bars are always free of parabens, plastic, sulfates, silicone, and artificial fragrances, focusing instead on rosemary, chamomile, rose hip, snow mushroom, and willow bark extracts.

    “It’s been overwhelming to see how many people care about and appreciate decisions like this and we’ve been so honored to get to grow our community with like-minded people. We’re excited to keep making a difference in the beauty industry!” – Sarah Cloes, Founder Flora Flora Co.

    After her first year in business, Sarah was approached by a large national retailer to sell her brand in hundreds of stores, but after disagreeing on sustainable shipping and packaging practices, she turned down the chain. She took her frustrations to Tik Tok, where she was applauded for sticking to her brand’s ethos and avoiding greenwashing. She thought the decision would be a significant setback, but instead, it transformed her business. Flora Flora sold out three times, gained thousands of new customers, and increased its social media following by 45,000 followers.

    While traditional liquid shampoo is up to 80% water, Flora Flora’s shampoo and conditioner bars contain concentrated ingredients that can replace up to 3 plastic bottles of liquid shampoo or conditioner. Their packaging is sustainably made in San Diego using 25% hemp and 75% recycled material. Flora Flora also aims to give back and be accessible. Every 1 out of 10 bars sold is donated to domestic violence shelters. 

    Whether you need a volumizing, clarifying, or scalp-soothing routine, take their online quiz or order their sustainable sample set to experience their best sellers before committing. With scent blends like Late Summer, Citrus Grove, and Herb Garden, it’s easy to ditch the bottle and start receiving tailored, sustainable hair care today.

    01

    Natureofthings

    Natureofthings is a holistic body care brand inspired by and rooted in nature, including its commitment to sustainability. The brand is committed to creating products meant to make life more pleasurable and enjoyable. Their minimal branding makes for easy packaging repurposing as the founders ensured to think about their products’ entire lifecycle at the inception of the brand.

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    The Dirt Company

    The Dirt Company is on a mission to clean up the planet while cleaning your clothes. This small Australian team began working in 2013 to create a zero-waste laundry system using recycled and refillable products. With their Refill, Return System, customers replace bulky plastic jugs with sleek, durable glass dispenser bottles. The bottles come pre-filled with their top-rated, highly concentrated, plant-based laundry detergent.

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    Rif Care

    Their 100% plant-based and biodegradable menstrual pads are carbon neutral by design. The brand uses leftover fibers from hemp oil production to create its premium product line. Regenerative hemp farming uses less water than cotton, grows without pesticides, and reverses the effects of climate change by capturing, securing, and storing CO2 in the ground to improve air and soil quality.