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  • Nourish Your Oral Health with Davids Natural Toothpaste Formulas

    the unwash review

    Written By Contributing Editor Liz Grogan

    Davids Toothpaste has performed thousands of hours of research to define the best natural and clean ingredients for removing plaque, whitening teeth, and freshening your breath. I feel clean and fresh after using the sensitive+whitening peppermint toothpaste, tongue scraper, and bamboo toothbrush, and the low-waste products serve as my morning reminder to make sustainable choices throughout the day. 

    While the FDA has not created a regulatory definition for “natural” and “clean” self-care products, Davids has established its own guidelines. Their description of “natural” means using only ingredients sourced and derived from nature, resulting in formulas free of artificial ingredients. For them, “clean” products do not contain proven or suspected toxic ingredients to you or the planet, and all their products undergo mindful creation and production (for example, all ingredients are ethically sourced and cruelty-free).

    “Legacy toothpaste brands commonly contain ingredients that many health-conscious consumers are actively looking to avoid. As I began diving deeper into studying the ingredients, it became a full-blown obsession to personally formulate the highest quality natural toothpaste available. Instead of using a long list of artificial/synthetic ingredients, Davids uses ingredients that are naturally sourced and naturally derived.” – Eric Buss, Davids Toothpaste Founder

    Davids Toothpaste chose its metal tube packaging for its ability to be easily and effectively recycled when you follow the brand’s step-by-step instructions. David’s will not take back the tubes, so It’s up to you to make sure your local waste management providers will adequately sort and recycle them. Luckily, aluminum can be endlessly recycled with far less energy required, and aluminum recycling programs are often much more successful than plastic recycling. Unlike plastic, bamboo toothbrushes are biodegradable and compostable and will decompose when disposed of correctly.

    Each tube includes a roller key to help squeeze all your toothpaste out until the very end. The metal tube keys are recyclable or can be repurposed with other products. David’s gives you the option to return 20 tube keys at a time for proper recycling and will send you a free toothpaste tube in return. Since I prefer reusing over recycling, I asked them to ship future orders without the tube keys and caps, an option outlined in their faq page, so that I could repurpose the original ones for future orders. 

    Beyond promoting natural and clean self-care, the brand highlights mindfulness, mental health, and minimalism as part of its “progress over perfection” mindset. The brand spotlights how holistic oral care can not only improve the planet, but can also support gut health and mental well-being. Davids believes the mouth acts as a window to overall health and that when we take the time to nourish our oral health, we can unexpectantly nurture our mental health as well.

    01

    The Dirt Company

    The Dirt Company is on a mission to clean up the planet while cleaning your clothes. With their Refill, Return System, customers replace bulky plastic jugs with sleek, durable glass dispenser bottles. The bottles come pre-filled with their top-rated, highly concentrated, plant-based laundry detergent. Their biodegradable concentrates deliver more loads per bottle and contain better-quality natural ingredients, such as high-performing enzymes.

    02

    Rif Care

    Their 100% plant-based and biodegradable menstrual pads are carbon neutral by design. The brand uses leftover fibers from hemp oil production to create its premium product line. Regenerative hemp farming uses less water than cotton, grows without pesticides, and reverses the effects of climate change by capturing, securing, and storing CO2 in the ground to improve air and soil quality.

    03

    Biom

    Biom offers 100% plant-based, biodegradable wipes with refillable packaging that provide functionality and smart design all in one. It doesn’t hurt that they’ll look great sitting on your counter. The all-purpose cleaning and sanitizing wipes were created with the planet and consumer in mind. The brand focuses on more streamlined, gentle ingredients that are safe on skin for their hand-sanitizing wipes. 

    The Brand Embracing It’s Anti-Consumerist Roots: Everyday Oil

    the unwash review

    Everyday Oil is exactly as it sounds, an oil for every day, for every use. Formulated for a variety of uses to embrace a minimalist self-care routine, Everyday Oil is a unique powerhouse product. The oil blend is certified-organic, cold-pressed, containing distilled botanicals. The simple yet effective, high-quality product works as a multi-faceted hydrator for all of your skin, body, and hair needs. The brand’s core embraces simplicity and quality, making an easy-to-use, no-fuss oil.

    Everyday Oil is a multi-use product that can be used for just about anything. Whether you want to use it to hydrate your entire body, your face, or even your hair, this product is the ultimate multi-hyphenate. The brand solely focuses on its namesake product, which can be purchased in an 8 oz, travel size or an aluminum refill. All of their oils are packaged in glass or aluminum, both of which can be easily repurposed or recycled. Their other products including their Meridian Hair Comb, Gua Sha, and Dry Brush are plastic-free, made from wood or stone.

    “There is something inherently anti-consumerist about everyday oil. we try to provide something that is so good for your skin, that is the highest quality ingredients possible as affordably as possible. That is in line with my larger philosophy in life, to treat others as you would want to be treated, and everyday oil’s core mission comes from my own core values – simplicity, quality and value.” – Emma Allen, Everyday Oil Founder

    The brand was founded by Emma Allen in 2016, ultimately inspired by a low-maintenance routine. The concept was in the works for about a decade as a personal project but it became clear that this was a product that other people could also benefit from. Emma uses Everyday Oil as her only skincare product, including cleansing and hydrating. Emma sees the company as an outset of the beauty industry as a brand that is committed to less and embracing natural beauty. Oils can be a divisive product, many people not knowing the difference between formulations or usages including misconceptions about oils causing breakouts or ‘clogged’ pores. Not all oils are made the same, Everyday Oil is an example of this with its unique formula that can be used for all over body, skin, and hair care.

    Streamlined beauty products make a minimalist, low-waste routine easy to sustain. Less is more is a commonly used phrase when it comes to sustainable products but Everyday Oil fully embodies this mantra as a product that could cut your beauty product buying down by over half. The brand fills a much-needed void and breaks boundaries by providing a product that can be used by a multitude of people in a variety of ways.

    01

    Corpus

    The product line stands out from the crowd with its signature light green hue and sleek design. The aesthetically pleasing design will transport your bathroom or vanity to the likeness of a luxury boutique hotel. Their products come in an assortment of different scents and are formulated similarly to perfumes with long-lasting fragrance payoff. The brand values transparency and is forthcoming about its manufacturing processes and ingredient sourcing, which is readily available on its website and social media outlets.

    02

    Noto Botanics

    Noto Botanics is an inclusive skincare and beauty brand that is focused on making an impact, especially in the LGBTQIA+ community. The brand is multi-use for an array of skincare needs with its minimalist, streamlined product line. Their line includes moisturizers, serums, cleansers, and lip and cheek tints. Noto Botanics is just as much about its products as they are about its mission. The brand’s DNA is rooted in inclusivity, community, and giving back.

    03

    Natureofthings

    Natureofthings is a holistic body care brand inspired by and rooted in nature, including its commitment to sustainability. The brand is committed to creating products meant to make life more pleasurable and enjoyable. Their minimal branding makes for easy packaging repurposing as the founders ensured to think about their products’ entire lifecycle at the inception of the brand.

    Submission Beauty is Creating a Plastic-Free Future

    the unwash review

    If there’s one thing we know for sure it’s that there’s way too much plastic in the beauty industry. When we think of zero-plastic makeup, thoughts of minimalist routines and skin-like finishes come to mind. Submission Beauty is a completely plastic-free beauty brand that embraces maximalism with its biodegradable glitter. Traditional glitter products are not completely body safe and do not completely disintegrate even years after disposal. Submission Beauty is changing this by making a body-safe, plastic-free, biodegradable, luxury glitter.

    Submission’s specialty is biodegradable glitter made from eucalyptus cellulose derived from trees. Their glitter is made using Bioglitter which has a certification for freshwater biodegradability making it biodegrade quickly and safely in natural environments. Submission Beauty is cruelty-free, GMO-free, and allergen-free and is safe for use around the lips and eyes. The glitter itself is plastic-free and biodegradable but the brand also only uses glass packaging to make for easier recyclability or repurposing.

    “I really want to elevate sustainable brands because I couldn’t find one that spoke to my aesthetic and style while still doing good for our bodies and environment. I wanted Submission to be something that looks beautiful but, at the same time, you are buying into a community and part of something that actually makes a difference.” – Zenia Jaeger, Submission Beauty Founder

    The Los Angeles-based brand launched in 2022 and has grabbed mainstream attention with collaborations with Scandinavian style powerhouse, Ganni. With less than three years in business, the brand has also opened a flagship store in LA’s Silver Lake neighborhood. Submission has gained a popular following with its transparent and forthcoming approach to discussing sustainability. The brand doesn’t shy away from putting its values on display with slogans including ‘plastic is poison’ and ‘glitter not litter’.

    When Submission Beauty founder Zenia Jaeger moved from Denmark to the United States she was interested in the differences in cosmetic regulations and the alarming amount of greenwashing in the beauty industry which compelled her to make a change. Armed with the basic notion that plastic is both bad for us and the environment, Submission Beauty allows for self-expression through a lens of mindfulness. Plastic-free brands such as Submission Beauty are setting the standard for creating meaningful change around the lifecycle of products.

    01

    Kjaer Weis

    Kjaer Weis intertwines sustainability and luxury beauty in a way that creates meaningful industry change. The brand has been an innovator for modern makeup before it was deemed an industry necessity to create actionable change in terms of product waste. Their products are a photo shoot and runway staple for a reason, giving a ‘your skin but better’ glow with all of their products.

    02

    TooD Beauty

    TooD Beauty is about inclusivity, embracing yourself, and diversity – a mission we can get behind. You might be familiar with this brand because of its biodegradable glitter collection, but there is so much more that TooD has to offer. The landscape of the makeup industry is constantly changing, but TooD is working on standing the test of time by encouraging its consumers to join them on the path of ‘radical self-acceptance.’ The brand embraces a fun and funky aesthetic that lets your true self shine both on the inside and outside.

    03

    Noto Botanics

    Noto Botanics is an inclusive skincare and beauty brand that is focused on making an impact, especially in the LGBTQIA+ community. The brand is multi-use for an array of skincare needs with its minimalist, streamlined product line. Their line includes moisturizers, serums, cleansers, and lip and cheek tints. Noto Botanics is just as much about its products as they are about its mission. The brand’s DNA is rooted in inclusivity, community, and giving back.

    Great Wrap, the New Paradigm in Cling Wrap and Packaging

    the unwash review

    Written by Contributing Editor Liz Grogan

    Australian husband and wife duo Jordy and Julia Kay left their former industries to create Great Wrap, a 100% compostable and marine biodegradable stretch wrap that breaks down naturally via composting in under 180 days. Great Wrap performs to the same standard as conventional plastic wraps, but is made using the abundant potato waste that comes from foods like french fries and potato chips. 

    Swapping a petroleum-based plastic wrap with Great Wrap is a small yet effective way to positively impact the planet and reduce waste. The used stretch wrap is given a second life through composting, securing carbon in the soil, and improving air quality. The starter kit includes the Great Mate dispenser made from 33 recycled PET bottles and 2 Nudie rolls, the compostable cling wrap designed to refill the dispenser. The reusable dispenser comes in 4 colors – lila, pea, sandy, and pebble, to match and elevate any kitchen striving for zero waste.

    As an architect, Julia saw massive waste in the construction industry. In the U.S. alone, 145 million tons of construction waste go to landfills yearly. Her husband, Jordy, was making natural wine when he also became frustrated with the amount of plastic required to package and transport goods. They saw a manufacturing shift in energy, transport, and agriculture, but plastic remained the same. Since launching in 2023, they’ve become a Certified B Corp and expanded their product line to include compostable pallet wrap, pallet caps, and catering wrap for businesses.

    “We invented the products we knew the world was missing so we could dump plastic once and for all. At Great Wrap, we are driven by impact, fueled by demand and have a 10-year vision for a world where plastic doesn’t exist.” – Julia Kay, Great Wrap Co-CEO & Co-Founder

    Great Wrap makes it easy for consumers and businesses to adopt materials that aren’t destined for landfills. Their team of bio-designers, engineers, and scientists refuse to support half-truths or greenwashing. They understand solving the plastic problem requires fully rethinking and redesigning future materials through regeneration, and they’ve already gained support from businesses and government officials in Australia. In the U.S., larger cities have also embraced circularity as a solution. New York City recently passed legislation requiring citizens to separate food waste and compostable materials for mandatory composting by 2024.

    Composting is a simple and enjoyable way to minimize your environmental footprint. If you’re curious about exploring the best composting solution for your lifestyle and living space, Great Wrap’s website is a great place to start. The rapidly changing world of packaging may be intimidating, but Great Wrap makes it easy to end your reliance on traditional plastics by promoting circularity in your kitchen.

    01

    The Dirt Company

    The Dirt Company is on a mission to clean up the planet while cleaning your clothes. This small Australian team began working in 2013 to create a zero-waste laundry system using recycled and refillable products. With their Refill, Return System, customers replace bulky plastic jugs with sleek, durable glass dispenser bottles. The bottles come pre-filled with their top-rated, highly concentrated, plant-based laundry detergent.

    02

    Biom

    Biom offers 100% plant-based, biodegradable wipes with refillable packaging that provide functionality and smart design all in one. It doesn’t hurt that they’ll look great sitting on your counter. The all-purpose cleaning and sanitizing wipes were created with the planet and consumer in mind. The brand focuses on more streamlined, gentle ingredients that are safe on skin for their hand-sanitizing wipes. 

    03

    Guests on Earth

    Guests on Earth is a planet-minded home cleaning company helping reduce plastic waste traditionally used with cleaning products. Providing transparency from where ingredients are sourced to where your product is being packaged, this brand is working to help consumers be more aware of the lifecycle of their purchases. Seeing a gap in the industry and lack of innovation, Guests on Earth wanted to create a product that is something consumers can genuinely feel good about.

    Forging a More Sustainable Future for Fashion with Dana Thomas

    the unwash: exclusive interview

    Dana Thomas is no stranger to the world of sustainable fashion. The fashion and culture journalist who resides as British Vogue’s European Sustainability Editor sees fashion and clothing as an integral part of our lives with a deep need for sustainable change. Fashion is intertwined with culture and the human experience which Dana dives into through her work as a journalist and New York Times Best Selling author. The Unwash sat down with Dana to discuss her work, the future of the fashion industry, and what living a sustainable lifestyle means to her.

    Have you always considered yourself to be an environmentalist? If not, where did the inspiration come from to make this a main focal point of your work? 

    As a child of the 1970s, environmentalism—or what we called “ecology” back then—has always been a part of my life. Our student teachers were hippies, who took classes outside, to sit on the grass, to learn. We planted trees on Earth Day. My family always had an organic vegetable garden, and so have I. But it has only recently become part of my work because the subject has finally come front and center in the news—finally, the papers have climate desks and climate reporters. And the devastating impact the fashion industry has on the planet can no longer be ignored. I have long covered fashion as a serious news beat, with an investigative journalism approach—thanks to my upbringing at the Washington Post in the late 1980s and early 1990s. For a long time, I was the only one reporting on the subject in that manner. But with the Paris Climate Agreement, and pending legislation in Europe and the US, the environment is becoming a central part of covering fashion—including digging up the stuff that the brands don’t want consumers to see. It’s kept me busy!

    “There are a slew of young people who are coming into fashion now with a greener point of view. Sustainability and the environment are a central part of fashion school education—it’s embedded in students’ practices from day one. So I think the question should be: who is not changing?” – Dana Thomas, UK Vogue’s European Sustainability Editor & NYT Best Selling Author

    Continuing off the first question, what made you want to have such a large focus on sustainability within the fashion industry?

    The more I became aware of the damage fashion has on the planet and people, the more it became clear to me that the subject needed serious attention. Consumers should know how their purchases support this polluting machine.

    As someone within the industry, where do you see fashion at large going in terms of sustainability? 

    I actually don’t work “within” the industry; I stand outside of it and observe it. What I see is a lot of greenwashing—a lot of talk, not a lot of action that will actually affect positive change. Fashion companies make a lot of money with their current business model; they don’t want to change, and make less money. So they aren’t, really.

    Are there any emerging designers that you think people should really have an eye on right now?

    There are a slew of young people who are coming into fashion now with a greener point of view. Sustainability and the environment are a central part of fashion school education—it’s embedded in students’ practices from day one. So I think the question should be: who is not changing? And that would be most everyone over 40, most of the household names, except of course the leading voices in the movement, such as Stella McCartney and Gabriela Hearst. I don’t hear Marc Jacobs or Dries Van Noten or Nicholas Ghesquiere talking about the environment. Ever.

    Anything having to do with the environment and climate change can be so daunting – especially having a career that is centered around this, how do you find positivity and light within such heavy topics?

    I’m an optimist at heart. Tomorrow will always be better; we can improve or fix anything if we set our minds to it. And I find great inspiration in changemakers doing good works, as I prove in my book Fashionopolis. I spotlight many in the book, like Natalie Chanin of Alabama Chanin, and Sarah Bellos of Stony Creek Colors, and Stacy Flynn of Evrnu. And of course, I find uplifting stories for The Green Dream, too. In every area—from diamonds made of carbon to clean aviation. That’s why I call it the Podcast of Hope. We have enough doom-and-gloom in the news. I look for the positive stories.

    Out of all of the great conversations you’ve had on your podcast, which episode would you suggest first for someone new to learning about sustainability? 

    I think the one with Amber Valletta, the supermodel-turned-activist, is truly informative and inspiring. She talks about the heavy stuff but in an accessible way. And she shows that anyone can get involved and have a positive impact.

    What does sustainability look like to you within your daily life?

    I bike wherever I am—in Paris, where I live; in Milan, New York, and London, when I travel. As I said, I have an organic garden in the country (and a compost pile), and when I’m in the city, I shop on Sundays at the organic market. I shop my closet—I keep my clothes and re-wear them for years. The other night, I wore a 25-year-old dress to dinner, and everyone loved it and said it was so chic. I have shoes resoled. I buy well—no fast fashion in our house. We recycle, of course, and turn old sheets, towels, and T-shirts into rags. There’s always a pile of mending to be done. I use environment-friendly detergents, and biodegradable, natural shampoo and soap. If I have the choice between a train and a plane, I always take a train. I drive old cars—a 1964 Mustang, and a 1968 Fiat, which only has two cylinders, and requires a visit to the gas station twice a year. Though the next cars will be electric. I wish the Mustang EV wasn’t so ugly!

    Whether you’re a fashion aficionado or a sustainability newbie, Dana’s work offers a unique perspective and profound depth to expand our viewpoints on large-scale topics. The Green Dream Podcast with Dana Thomas brings in a variety of guests to discuss sustainability, science, and fashion, and how they intertwine with our personal experiences. Her latest book Fashionopolis: The Price of Fast Fashion and the Future of Clothes discusses the real, human price of fast fashion, providing a deeper understanding of the larger implications the fashion industry has. All of which are topics she dives into in her newly launched newsletter The Style Files. Sustainability looks and feels different to everyone, being embodied in a multitude of ways, how Dana has honed in on the fashion industry opens up the conversation for deeper change.

    01

    Completedworks

    Completedworks uses reclaimed, recycled, and ethically sourced materials such as marble, glass, bio-resin, and silver. The brand proves you don’t have to compromise design and style for sustainable practices but rather that the two can work in harmony to create timeless, wearable pieces. Sustainability is at the core of the brand’s ethos and the brand is committed to ensuring there is little to no negative environmental impact resulting from its products.

    02

    Henry Rose

    Henry Rose has three main mission pillars: ingredients, environmental, and social responsibility. The brand’s fragrances are nearly 99% biodegradable, and all the bottles are made from 90% recycled glass. The caps are derived from compostable soy, and all of the outer packaging is recyclable. The fragrance line was founded by Michelle Pfeiffer, and committed to environmental responsibility and creating a quality, long-lasting product.

    03

    Melyon

    Melyon is a Swedish skincare brand based out of Stockholm that is focused on inclusivity, sustainability, and ethical sourcing. Founded by Roger Dupé, an immigrant from Western Africa, Roger was inspired by his roots to create a skincare line that had people of color in mind and wanted them to feel as if this was a skincare line specifically for them and the needs of darker skin. The brand’s products transcend any ideas about beauty standards and rather embody an aura of accessibility and inclusivity around beauty.

    Common Heir is Cultivating Change Through Plastic-Free Skincare

    the unwash review

    Traditional makeup serums are typically packaged using pumps or droppers, different ideations such as capsules aren’t a new concept but typically aren’t honed in on as being a sustainable product. Common Heir created a system of biodegradable plastic-free serum pods for retinol, vitamin C, and ceramide serum. The brand is innovating the way we think about sustainability in the beauty industry and beyond. Their products are meant to spark joy and make people feel good about themselves and their self-care routine. Common Heir’s mission empowers the consumer to make positive changes and push the sustainability conversation forward.

    Common Heir saw an opportunity to create a gateway into using more sustainable products, without only catering to an audience that solely sought after zero-waste products. The company shows that there’s more to a sustainable lifestyle than just the term ‘zero-waste’. Their product line is both vegan and cruelty-free. Their current product line can build the perfect, streamlined skincare routine to tackle all your skincare needs including brightness, resurfacing, and hydration. Their high-quality formulations take into account both sensitive and melanated skin to help deliver results across the board for everyone regardless of skin type.

    “We wanted to make sustainability sexy. That’s the only way I think you’re going to change hearts and minds to make the kind of impact that we want to make.” – Cary Lin, Common Heir Co-Founder

    The brand was founded in 2019 by two women, Cary Lin and Angela Ubias that were seeking sustainable products with a luxury experience. Inspired by a common feeling by many founders in the sustainability space, Cary Lin was overwhelmed by the amount of plastic waste on our beaches and wanted to work towards a solution. The vitamin C, retinol and ceramide formulas are highly concentrated, single doses that are packaged in plastic-free, biodegradable capsules. For outer packaging recyclable paper packaging is lightweight, therefore, reducing carbon emissions.

    Common Heir is signaling a sustainable future by highlighting that products that don’t create waste are just not effective if not more than their traditional counterparts, and that there still can be a luxury experience that the brand embodies. The founder’s goal was to change the expectations of what a sustainable brand looks like which they achieved with their award-winning packaging and standout product formulations. The brand is creating an inclusive skincare brand that doesn’t compromise quality while also doing good for the planet.

    01

    Rif Care

    New naturally-sourced and sustainable period care options continue to fill our Instagram pages and shopping carts, pushing traditionally wasteful products to the back of shelves. What sets Rif care apart from other alternatives is their use of upcycled hemp fiber, a carbon sequestering super plant with naturally antibacterial and buttery soft properties.

    02

    NOTO Botanicals

    Noto Botanics is an inclusive skincare and beauty brand that is focused on making an impact, especially in the LGBTQIA+ community. The brand is multi-use for an array of skincare needs with its minimalist, streamlined product line. Noto Botanics is just as much about its products as they are about its mission. The brand’s DNA is rooted in inclusivity, community, and giving back.

    03

    Melyon

    Melyon is a Swedish skincare brand based out of Stockholm that is focused on inclusivity, sustainability, and ethical sourcing. The brand’s products transcend any ideas about beauty standards and rather embody an aura of accessibility and inclusivity around beauty. Melyon wanted to create products that not only were going to deliver results and have high-quality vegan formulations but were also made with environmental conservation in mind.

    The Skincare Brand That Gives Back, Noto Botanics

    the unwash review

    Noto Botanics is an inclusive skincare and beauty brand that is focused on making an impact, especially in the LGBTQIA+ community. The brand is multi-use for an array of skincare needs with its minimalist, streamlined product line. Their line includes moisturizers, serums, cleansers, and lip and cheek tints. Noto Botanics is just as much about its products as they are about its mission. The brand’s DNA is rooted in inclusivity, community, and giving back.

    Gloria Noto worked as a celebrity makeup artist with the hopes of eventually starting her own line. Her goal was to create a company that cultivated connections and celebrated everyone. Noto Botanics is more than a skincare and beauty brand but a company that stands for being unapologetically yourself. Gloria wanted to create space for fellow queer folks to feel heard and seen in the beauty industry. There was a lack of inclusivity and representation that Noto is working to fill. Noto gives back by regularly raising money for organizations such as Planned Parenthood, Project Q, and the ACLU, when you purchase a Noto product your money is actively giving back.

    “It is a political brand. I personally believe that every time you spend your dollar, you’re voting towards something or you’re supporting something, whether you realize it or not.” – Gloria Noto, NOTO Botanics Founder

    The brand uses primarily recyclable glass packaging with limited plastic usage which is 35% PCR. To continue their sustainability commitment, their flagship store in Los Angeles has a refill station for their products with hopes of expanding to locations. Their line is vegan, cruelty-free, and uses fair trade, ethically sourced pigments. They take a less is more approach with the belief that sustainability is also about finding products that fulfill multiple needs at once. Noto Botanics is genderless and made for all skin types. From the formulation to the packaging the brand steers in a neutral direction to appeal to everyone and all identities. 

    Noto is working to bring more inclusivity to the beauty industry with their mission of inclusivity. It’s important to find brands that you truly align with and feel empowered by. For Noto, their mission is more than a marketing opportunity or a pride month campaign but is a year-round, 24/7 commitment to creating equitable change and amplifying queer identities. The brand aligns itself with the ‘vote with your dollar’ mantra and believes that you’re supporting what you’re putting your money towards. Noto makes an impact in more than one way, their products go the extra mile and it’s a brand that walks the walk.

    01

    Klur

    Klur, a skincare brand focused on optimal skin health is rooted in values of inclusivity and ethical product sourcing. The Los Angeles-based brand takes a scientific approach to formulating products that deliver long-lasting results while being inspired by nature. Klur’s motto is being an ‘eco-inclusive’ brand that they live up to through their low-impact practices.

    02

    Corpus

     Corpus appeals to consumers looking for high-quality, naturally formulated products while being climate conscious through responsible packaging and ethical manufacturing practices. The product line stands out from the crowd with its signature light green hue and sleek design. The aesthetically pleasing design will transport your bathroom or vanity to the likeness of a luxury boutique hotel.

    03

    The Wilds

    Designed to simplify your skincare routine with quality products that deliver results, Canadian skincare brand, The Wilds embodies a less is more approach. The Wilds is a genderless skincare line that takes inspiration from nature and is suitable for various skin types.

    Underprotection is Making Sustainability Sexy

    the unwash review

    Underprotection makes sustainability sexy with its environmentally conscious lingerie line. Based out of Copenhagen, the founders saw the need for a sustainable option for something we need every day – underwear. The brand came into the industry with hopes of sparking change as they were one of few sustainable options on the market. As the brand has grown they have stayed true to their commitment to being a sustainable, ethical, and high-quality choice for intimates. Underprotection is transparent about everything from material sourcing, and factory conditions to shipping materials – putting a large value on consumer trust. Underprotection has made sustainability look better than ever before.

    Founded in 2010, the brand has since moved into other clothing categories such as swim, lounge, basics, and maternity. When the brand launched over ten years ago, founder Stephan Rosenkilde felt that there were no sustainable options within the clothing industry, especially not for intimates. The brand focuses on ethical sourcing and production processes as well as ensuring fair wages and safe working conditions. The main fabrics Underprotection uses are recycled wool, organic cotton, and recycled PET bottles for their swimwear collection.

    “The fashion industry is one of the biggest polluters in the world, which is why it is so important to create sustainable fashion. Back in 2010, there was not really any sustainable – and at the same time fashionable – lingerie, which is why we founded Underprotection. We do what we can to change the industry.” – Stephan Rosenkilde, Underprotection CEO.

    The brand is a certified B Corporation and has launched take-back, repair, and upcycle programs to minimize waste production and extend the longevity of its items. Transparency is a clear focus for the brand as they share their sustainability goals, clarity on materials being used, and detailed information about their production process. Choosing high-quality materials is at the forefront of Underprotection as their clothes sit close to the skin, especially their undergarments. Not only does the brand want their clothing to be good for the environment but also a better choice than conventional competitors for their consumers.

    The brand’s expansion outside of lingerie allows for further sustainable clothing options for everyday wear. Currently, Underprotection only offers XS-XL and we hope they expand their size range in the future for greater inclusivity as everyone should be allotted to shop ethically regardless of size. Whether you’re looking for some new loungewear to hang out in or everyday intimates, Underprotection is a brand that is committed to being a sustainable switch that reflects consumers’ values. They realize sustainability isn’t just about materials and limiting waste but about the greater community impact which reflects our ‘People Before Products’ motto. Underprotection wants their customers to not only feel beautiful in their lingerie but know they made a purchase that they can feel good about.

    01

    Klur

    Klur, a skincare brand focused on optimal skin health is rooted in values of inclusivity and ethical product sourcing. The Los Angeles-based brand takes a scientific approach to formulating products that deliver long-lasting results while being inspired by nature. Klur’s motto is being an ‘eco-inclusive’ brand that they live up to through their low-impact practices. The brand’s skincare products give streamlined solutions for various skin needs that are inclusive for all.

    02

    Eauso Vert

    Sourced with sustainable materials and committed to ingredient transparency, Eauso Vert is hoping to create a new standard in the luxury fragrance industry. Launched with six scents that range from fresh to woody and warm, there is a scent perfect for anyone. The founders reminisce on their memories with fragrance, whether childhood stories or travel, and wanted to create a fragrance line that helps the consumer tell a story.

    03

    Completedworks

    Completedworks uses reclaimed, recycled, and ethically sourced materials such as marble, glass, bio-resin, and silver. The brand proves you don’t have to compromise design and style for sustainable practices but rather that the two can work in harmony to create timeless, wearable pieces. Sustainability is at the core of the brand’s ethos and the brand is committed to ensuring there is little to no negative environmental impact resulting from its products or shipping process.

    Eco-Inclusive Skincare Brand, Klur

    the unwash review

    Klur, a skincare brand focused on optimal skin health is rooted in values of inclusivity and ethical product sourcing. The Los Angeles-based brand takes a scientific approach to formulating products that deliver long-lasting results while being inspired by nature. Klur’s motto is being an ‘eco-inclusive’ brand that they live up to through their low-impact practices. The brand’s skincare products give streamlined solutions for various skin needs that are inclusive for all. Their Brilliant Light vitamin C serum, Sculpture + A, and Gentle Matter Cleanser are some of their fan-favorite products meant to correct, hydrate and restore skin to its healthiest state.

    Founder of Klur, Lesley Thorton spent a decade creating products and helping others achieve their personal skincare goals while working for Estee Lauder which led to the creation of Klur as we know it today. When it comes to finding products that have a focus on environmentally friendly ingredients, Lesley realized there wasn’t representation for people of color within this space and wanted to create a brand that she could see herself in. Klur launched in 2019 with products made to support the needs and wear of everyday life – for everyone.  

    “Centering inclusivity and community as the fundamental values required to preserve planetary ecology and achieve true collective sustainability.” – Lesley Thorton, Klur Founder

    The brand is deeply committed to cultivating connections within its community. Klur was designed to create a space for all people from all ethnicities and backgrounds to feel supported and seen through the brand’s ethos. Their emphasis on community building also includes education on sustainability efforts such as proper recycling practices. The brand primarily uses pharmaceutical-grade glass packaging, aluminum components, and BPA-free plastic only when deemed necessary. Klur’s formulations are both vegan and cruelty-free, using only biodegradable ingredients. They look at sustainability through a holistic lens acknowledging that it’s more than just finding the most sustainable packaging but also finding brands that support our everyday needs. 

    Klur walks the walk and is a values-driven brand. The small but mighty independently owned and operated company sets the bar high within the wellness and skincare industry. Their core values are reflected in their products, from formulation, packaging choices, and commitment to consumer education. Klur is a refreshing addition to the beauty industry and a much-needed breath of fresh air for people in search of companies that they can feel genuinely good about supporting. 

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    Corpus

     Corpus appeals to consumers looking for high-quality, naturally formulated products while being climate conscious through responsible packaging and ethical manufacturing practices. Corpus launched with their fan-favorite deodorant stick and has now expanded into deodorant spray, body wash, and candles. Their products come in an assortment of different scents and are formulated similarly to perfumes with long-lasting fragrance payoff. 

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    Natureofthings

    Natureofthings is a holistic body care brand inspired by and rooted in nature, including its commitment to sustainability. The brand is committed to creating products meant to make life more pleasurable and enjoyable. Their minimal branding makes for easy packaging repurposing as the founders ensured to think about their products’ entire lifecycle at the inception of the brand.

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    Melyon

    Melyon is a Swedish skincare brand based out of Stockholm that is focused on inclusivity, sustainability, and ethical sourcing. Founded by Roger Dupé, an immigrant from Western Africa, Roger was inspired by his roots to create a skincare line that had people of color in mind and wanted them to feel as if this was a skincare line specifically for them and the needs of darker skin. The brand’s products transcend any ideas about beauty standards and rather embody an aura of accessibility and inclusivity around beauty.

    Can Brands Meet Consumers Need for Authenticity?

    the unwash: social impact

    Consumers are hungrier than ever to cultivate connections with their favorite brands but are brands able to deliver the level of authentic connection people are craving? More than ever the power has been put into the consumers’ hands. Brands that are founder-led have skyrocketed into popularity and have had an innate ability to not only create a connection with their audience but also establish trust. Ultimately, consumers are just wanting brands to keep it real and when they don’t – the windfall is steep. Overall, there’s a large yearning for depth, not just a recognizable logo. Consumers are turning to brands that are creating a community culture, not just selling great products.

    Over the past few years, authenticity has risen to the forefront of consumers’ minds – a drastic shift from a world where big marketing schemes, billboards, and tantalizing commercials ruled the industry. In the age of social media people don’t need large-scale advertisements that were once needed to be able to sell a product. The ability to share individual experiences with a product is at our fingertips, whether that be for better or worse. Perfection is no longer the goal. Brands are leaning into the curiosity to pull back the curtain and show what happens behind the scenes, something that larger brands are typically unable to do successfully in a way that feels authentic for viewers. The ability to create a level of realness around a brand is a daunting task, especially in a hyper-critical age but, people more and more are being drawn to something that feels relatable.

    “There is a much bigger opportunity to have founder-led brands rather than corporate-led ones so that we’re getting brands with values. There is a clear interest from consumers on that. We can democratize beauty in a way.” – Megan Graham, Ries Founder

    The availability of knowledge in the media age also creates a demand for transparency. Can brands keep up with the need to be able to walk the walk? There’s no more room for too-good-to-be-true claims or greenwashing marketing gimmicks. Consumers are wanting to know that what they’re buying is worth it as awareness of the greater impact of our purchases is becoming more apparent. Smaller, founder-led brands have seen increased success with taking a ‘hide-nothing’ approach by being honest, even about their flaws. Skincare brand, Dieux is the ultimate example of this and is something the brand credits its success for. There are always ways to be doing something better. There’s always a more sustainable option or a more ethical way to produce a product but these might not be readily available or feasible for a newer brand but honesty keeps the sales growing.

    Community is driving sales and consumers want to be connected. Currently, consumers are more inclined to buy products and invest in brands that align with their values. The digital age has opened up the floodgates for consumers to connect with like-minded individuals and bond over their favorite products or brands in a way that hasn’t happened before. The need for authenticity creates a unique bottom line for brands. Emerging and household brand names alike have to fulfill these needs and be able to meet the new standards that have been set. Giving an occasional behind the scene look, vague sustainability metrics, and a one-off inclusion marketing bit is no longer acceptable. 

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    DedCool

    DedCool places a lot of its focus when creating new products on usability in the day-to-day. Instead of solely purchasing a perfume that you spray on yourself, your clothes, or around your apartment, their product range allows the consumer to have versatility with their signature scent through their detergent, home fragrance, and car fragrance products. The brand’s fragrances are genderless and come in various scent families.

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    Klur

    Klur, a skincare brand focused on optimal skin health is rooted in values of inclusivity and ethical product sourcing. The Los Angeles-based brand takes a scientific approach to formulating products that deliver long-lasting results while being inspired by nature. Klur’s motto is being an ‘eco-inclusive’ brand that they live up to through their low-impact practices. The brand’s skincare products give streamlined solutions for various skin needs that are inclusive for all.

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    Dieux

    The brand credits its vastly growing audience to Dieux’s authenticity. The founders keep it real with their consumers and have no interest in marketing gimmicks but are determined to sell high-quality products that pack a punch. Their concise yet impactful product line focuses on protecting the skin barrier and locking moisture in. Dieux is helping consumers buy less because their products are ‘dieux-ing’ more.